Sign In to Online Banking Enter User ID to Reset Password



Forgot Password or First Time User?
Effective December 31, 2016 we will be discontinuing our P.O.Box. Please send all correspondence and mail to our current address: 255 California Street, Suite 600, San Francisco, CA 94111

Fraud comes in many shapes and sizes, but the outcome is the same: the loss of both money and time. That’s why protecting your computer and your privacy is so important. On the following pages you will find helpful information that will allow you to interact with New Resource in a secure manner and to protect your security and privacy online and off. Please review these to be sure that you are doing everything you can to protect yourself. Your online banking security and your privacy are of vital concern to New Resource Bank.

Online Banking Security

  • Creating strong passwords

    Your online user ID and password identify you to the New Resource online banking system when you begin a session. You should memorize your password and never write it down, save on your computer, or reveal it to anyone.

    Follow these tips for strong passwords:

    • Make your password 8–32 characters long — the longer, the better.
    • Use upper and lowercase letters.
    • Include at least four different characters (no repeats).
    • Use at least one special character, plus numerals.
    • Choose a sequence of random letters and numbers.
    • Don’t include obvious or easily obtainable information.

    You will be required to change your password every 90 days. You can easily change your password by going to the Security page under Preferences in the left-hand navigation page within online banking.

    To protect your user ID and password security, remember to sign out of online banking and close all open browser windows when you are done; this is especially important if you are not working on your own computer. For your security, online banking will automatically end your banking session after 15 minutes of inactivity.

  • Submitting forms online

    Information you provide via electronic forms on the New Resource website is secure and encrypted, meaning that it is scrambled en route and decoded once it reaches the bank’s servers. You can confirm that your web session is secure by looking for a small lock symbol located in the top left corner of your web browser window. You can also look for the letters “https://” at the beginning of the website address in your browser. The “s” means that the web connection is secure.

  • Sending email to New Resource

    Email messages sent within the New Resource online banking system are secure. However, messages sent to the bank through personal email accounts may not be protected. Therefore, we ask that you do not send confidential information such as Social Security numbers or account numbers to us via email outside of online banking. Such communications should be sent to us via postal mail or delivered to our office, or you may call 415.995.8100.

Business Online Best Practices

  • Steps you can take to protect yourself from online fraud

    • If possible, do all your online banking on a dedicated computer that isn’t used for email or any other web browsing.
    • Ensure your virus and spyware protection programs are installed and up to date.
    • When possible, separate duties so that transactions are drafted by one user and approved by another. We suggest you request your online banking setup be configured with “dual control required” – just let us know which transactions you want to enforce this on. The system also has the ability to set limits on the users where anything above a certain level needs to be approved by a different user. This is another easy way of giving users freedom to do everyday items while limiting the risk of mistakes or fraud.
    • Setup transaction level approval to require that every transaction be approved through a text message or a phone call. This ensures that if your computer browser is compromised, no transactions that move money outside your accounts can be completed without approval. You can take this one step further by requiring certain transactions need a code from a third party security token (a small device with an algorithm generated number than changes every 30 seconds or an app on your smartphone that does the same thing.)
    • We recommend setting your high activity accounts up with Positive Pay service. This service ensures that only checks that you’ve issued or ACH originators that you’ve approved are allowed to post to your account.

Protecting Your Computer

  • Anti-virus software

    • Install antivirus software on your computer.
    • Keep your antivirus software license current.
    • Open email and attachments only from senders whom you know.
    • If you receive an attachment from someone you do not know, or you are not expecting an attachment, delete the file without opening it.

    Learn more

  • Email safety

    • Don’t include sensitive information in email.
    • Never click on links within an email.
    • Don’t open spam or attachments from strangers.
    • Be suspicious of emails asking for personal information.
    • Be selective when providing your email address.

    Learn more

  • Anti-spyware software

    • Install anti-spyware software on your computer.
    • Keep your anti-spyware software license current.
    • Read software agreements to understand exactly what applications are being installed on your computer.
    • Download software from the Internet only from trusted sources.

    Learn more

  • Firewall protection

    • Check your operating system to verify that your firewall is turned on.
    • If you don’t have a firewall, install one.
    • Use a firewall in conjunction with antivirus and anti-spyware software.

    Learn more

  • Online identity protection

    • Update and strengthen the security of your online passwords.
    • Use a secure browser and trusted computer for sensitive transactions.
    • Log off when you’re done using websites that require a user ID and password.
    • Shut down your computer when you’re not using it.
    • Lock your computer when it’s not in use.
    • Beware of shoulder surfing.

    Learn more

  • Software updates

    • Check your operating system’s automatic update settings to ensure you’re receiving updates.
    • Check your software programs for updates that may be available in the Help menu or on the vendor’s website.
    • Pay attention to pop-up messages within a program: these may be notices of available software updates.

    Learn more

Protecting Your Privacy

  • Email safety

    • Don’t include sensitive information in email.
    • Never click on links within an email.
    • Don’t open spam or attachments from strangers.
    • Be suspicious of emails asking for personal information.
    • Be selective when providing your email address.

    Learn More

  • Online identity protection

    • Update and strengthen the security of your online passwords.
    • Use a secure browser and trusted computer for sensitive transactions.
    • Log off when you’re done using websites that require a user ID and password.
    • Shut down your computer when you’re not using it.
    • Lock your computer when it’s not in use.
    • Beware of shoulder surfing.

    Learn More

  • Offline identity protection

    • Monitor your postal mail.
    • Don’t give out your personal information freely.
    • Check your credit report annually.
    • Shred documents containing personal information before discarding them.

    Learn More

Reporting Fraud

  • If you are the victim of fraud

    If you think you’ve been a victim of identity theft, take immediate action and follow these five steps.

    1. Report the fraudulent activity – If the activity is related to New Resource, please contact us directly. If it is related to another financial institution, your credit card company, or any other organization contact them directly.

    2. Contact a consumer reporting agency – Having a fraud alert placed on your credit report will help stop criminals from opening any additional accounts in your name. Contact only one of the following agencies; they are each required to contact the other two:

    • Equifax: 800.525.6285; www.equifax.com ; P.O. Box 740241, Atlanta, GA 30374-0241
    • Experian: 888.397.3742; www.experian.com ; P.O. Box 9532, Allen, TX 75013
    • TransUnion: 800.680.7289; www.transunion.com ; Fraud Victim Assistance Division, P.O. Box 6790, Fullerton, CA 92834-6790

    3. Close any accounts you think may have been tampered with – Report the transgression to a security spokesperson at the relevant company. Ask them about any additional steps—they’ll probably ask you to send relevant copies of the fraudulent activity. You can use the FTC ID Theft Affidavit as formal certification of your dispute; see the FTC’s Identity Theft Report instructions  for details.

    4. File your complaint with the FTC – Use the online complaint form or call the FTC’s toll-free Identity Theft Hotline, 877.438.4338; TTY, 866.653.4261; or write to the Identity Theft Clearinghouse, Federal Trade Commission, 600 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20580. Sharing your identity theft complaint with the FTC will help law enforcement officials track down identity thieves and stop them.

    5. File a police report –

    Call or visit the local police or police in the community where the identity theft took place and file a report. Have a copy of your FTC ID Theft Affidavit available to give them. Obtain a copy of the police report and the police report number.

    Go to the FTC’s Identity Theft site  for more tips.

Elder Abuse

  • What is "elder abuse"?

    As elders become more physically frail, they’re less able to stand up to bullying or fight back if attacked. They may not see or hear as well or think as clearly as they used to, leaving openings for unscrupulous people to take advantage of them. Mental or physical ailments may also make them more trying companions for the people who live with them.

  • Signs of elder abuse

    Elder abuse can take many forms, and we all need to be aware of the signs. Elders are often targeted for their money. An unscrupulous caregiver might do any of the following:

    • Misuse an elder’s personal checks, credit cards or accounts
    • Steal cash, income checks or household goods
    • Forge the elder’s signature
    • Engage in identity theft
  • Typical scams that target elders

    • Announcements of a “prize” that the elderly person has won but must pay money to claim
    • Phony charities
    • Investment fraud
  • Getting help

    If you are an elder who is being abused, neglected or exploited, tell your doctor, a friend or a family member whom you trust. Other people care and can help you.

    New Resource staff members are trained in recognizing signs of elder abuse (including physical and financial exploitation) and are required to report any signs of abuse to authorities.